Of bonds and blooms

Today, we’ll discuss a coastal danger. It kills marine animals, contaminates shellfish, and aggravates asthma. And we’ll find out what two scientists – Barb and Gary Kirkpatrick of the Mote Marine Lab in Sarasota, Florida – are doing to help matters.

The Kirkpatricks used to have separate careers, but as Barb said, “…we’ve sorta morphed into working down the hall from each other, which if you would’ve just told me that 15 years ago, I woulda just said, ‘Get outta here.'”

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Slideshow

Automated red tide detector shown opened and in cross-section. Credit: Lance Robson.

Barb Kirkpatrick and undergrad Elizabeth Moser demonstrate how to use the spirometer. Credit: Lance Robson.

Gary and Barb Kirkpatrick at the Mote Marine Lab in Sarasota, Florida. Credit: Lance Robson.

Education Standards

National Science Education Standards Grade 5 to 8

National Science Education Standards Grade 9 to 12

Ocean Literacy Principles

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Of bonds and blooms

1 Comments

  1. Barb and Gary-
    Thank you for sharing your very important research, and once again, another very interesting pathway that led you to your research!
    Liesl

  2. […] Listen to episode 10 of the Ocean Gazing podcast. […]

Of bonds and blooms

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